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Kombucha

March 19, 2014 - Stephanie Brown
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Food Processing & Preservation
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Fermentation Supplies
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Video Transcript
Hi I'm Tricia an organic gardener and I grow organically for a healthy and safe food supply, for a clean and sustainable environment, for an enjoyable and rewarding experience.

Kombucha is a fermented sweet tea this beverage has been enjoyed for centuries in China, Japan and Russia its teeming with probiotics we're going to whip up a batch today and I'll show you how to do it. We will be using this Kombucha kit which contains everything you'll need to brew. It contains the scoby, the sugar, the tea the food grade glass jar, organic cotton cloth, rubber band and temperature strip. Very important to sterilize and clean everything that's going to come in contact with the Kombucha I'm using this Star San sanitizer. Like with any fermented product it's critical for food safety to make sure that no alien bacteria contaminate your tea.

Now we're going to boil two cups of water it's recommended to use distilled or reverse osmosis purified water if you have chlorinated water allow the tea too steep twenty minutes. The most popular teas are green teas or black teas but you can also use oolong teas, white teas or yerba mate just avoid flavored teas or any herbal teas that contain oil. The fermenting Kombucha will create a very acidic environment from a pH of three point zero up to four point five that's why it's very important to use only a glass jar for fermentation. While were waiting for the tea to steep I'm going to add the temperature strip to the fermenting jar. Just remove the teabag and add the tea to the fermenting jar and then add the sugar.

You can use white sugar or cane sugar this is going to be food for the yeast to eat and it's an important part of what makes your Kombucha safe so don't use less or make any substitutions. Don't use sweeteners like stevia or xylitol because they're inedible to yeast avoid honey which contains its own set of microorganisms and can retard the growth of the other microbes also avoid brown sugar which will give the tea an off flavor.

Now add four cups of cold water once the temperature strip reads below ninety degrees you can add your scoby and starter culture. Scoby stands for symbiotic colony of bacteria and yeast and this disk contains all the microorganisms that are gonna be used to ferment the tea. Again make sure everything that touches your scoby is sterile to avoid contaminating your tea. Add the cotton cloth over the top of the jar and secure it with a rubber band and then set the jar in a warm location out of the direct sunlight for about a week.

You'll see a new scoby form on the top of your jar be on the alert for mold growth on the scoby if you do get mold you should throw the tea out and try again with a new scoby. Using a sterilized straw you can taste your kombucha just put the straw in put your finger over it get a little bit of your tea out. Time to taste remember if your kombucha looks, tastes or smells bad throw it out an important home preservation maxim is when in doubt throw it out. Younger Kombucha is sweeter fermentation is generally seven to ten days but you can go as long as three to five weeks. When the Kombucha is to your liking lift out your new scoby and place it in a sterilized clean sealed jar with three-quarters cup of kombucha and it will be ready for you next brew remember everything that touches your kombucha should be sterilized. Next you can flavor up your kombucha or you can bottle it as is. Check out our blog for some flavoring ideas.

Here are some kombucha guidelines store your kombucha in a refrigerator if you're not used to drinking kombucha it's a good idea to acclimate yourself to it gradually It's a good idea not to drink more than eight ounces of kombucha a day because of its acidity up Brew some kombucha and grow organic for life!

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Categories: Food Processing & Preservation, Fermentation Supplies


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